Skip to main content
Microsoft profile picture

Mike Brady

7 months ago

Memory Use in low-memory devices

With each feature update (since 1607, at least), Windows 10 uses more memory (and disk space, but that's another day). It's getting to where 50-60% of RAM in a tablet/2-in-1 (2GB RAM, Win10 Home 32-bit) or older laptop (4GB RAM, Win10 Home 64-bit) is taken for a multitude of services and other tasks most of which just site there - seldom actually using CPU cycles after system startup. Yes, we should buy new computers with more RAM, on a never-ending cycle. Sorry, not going to happen in the real world where budgets are tight. What Windows needs is to be more cognizant of what the machine it's running on has available, and adjust its running footprint to match. A good rule of thumb might be: 50% of RAM when not running apps explicitly opened by the user is probably too much. If I don't have a lot of RAM, load those services only when they're needed and unload them afterward. Yes, that would slow down things when the services are needed and have to be reloaded, but the overuse of RAM is slowing things down anyway by pushing things into swap when any significant app is opened. Using swap is a real pain with spinning rust, but not great with eMMC or slower SSDs either. Look in Task Manager sometime and note how much is sitting there at the bottom of the process list nearly all the time, using no CPU once the system has stabilized following startup; those tasks and services should be candidates for killing during normal use. At minimum (assuming a reasonably-sized C: drive), those should be swapped out after a certain amount of "dead" time without waiting for something else to be loaded that forces the issue (and slows the load of a task that is actually needed). ??? Mike B Plain Olde (Power, sometimes) User, from mainframe and pre-IBM PC days

1
0
0
1