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What is your favorite art application?
Which Windows app helps you be your most creative self? Do you use a stylus or a mouse? - Austin Product Advisor for Microsoft Stores.

04/23/2019

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Community Conversation
What do you think of Microsoft's UI Design?
Since Windows 8, Microsoft's taken the lead in pioneering modern UI design standards. The goal seems to be to make a cohesive touch-friendly UI across Windows, with an emphasis on flat, sharp elements and icons as well as tiles that have defined a lot of Microsoft's design language. With the inclusion of fluent design, subtle references to skeuomorphism, like lighting, highlights, and texture have been added back to Windows, without compromising any other modern design guidelines. These efforts are commendable, and demonstrates Microsoft's progressive design standards. However, the focus on mobile-friendly and touch-friendly interfaces has become concerning, especially since new designs have changed from a mobile-first to a mobile-only style. Large fonts and buttons, excessive padding, and limited customizability might be fine on mobile apps because mobile devices are limited, and more difficult to work with, but these same design elements are hostile and inefficient to mouse-and-keyboard users. If you compare Windows 10 apps to their Windows 7 counterparts, you can see that the newer apps take up more screen space while doing more or less the same function. This is a problem. A focus on Mobile-friendly design should not ever mean mouse-and-keyboard unfriendly, especially since this is the primary method of input on desktop computers. I was once especially fond of the Microsoft Office interface as an example of crisp, modern design that does not compromise mouse and keyboard usability. Most importantly, Office came with a "touch mode" and "mouse mode" option, creating the most optimal interface for each input method. However, the latest redesign of the Office ribbon seems to move further and further from these sensible design guidelines. The new simplified ribbon has no changes for mouse and touch mode, along with a host of other issues. I'm concerned over the direction of Microsoft's UI design, and I'd like to bring up these issues for consideration.

04/23/2019

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Community Conversation
What is your favorite Ease of Access Feature?
What is your favorite Ease of Access feature? If you could change something about that feature to make your daily life easier what would it be? - Rana, Cloud Technical Expert at Microsoft Store

04/23/2019

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Community Conversation
What's the future of Win32 and UWP?
For those who aren't familiar, Win32 applications are your traditional desktop programs. They are typically installed via a downloaded installer, can be run directly from their exe files and are located in the Program Files folder of every Windows computer. UWPs, on the other hand, are essentially glorified mobile apps as part of Microsoft's last-ditch effort to gain developer support for Windows Phone. They can only be distributed via the Windows Store, designed from the ground up to be mouse-unfriendly, and use a completely different application architecture than traditional programs. UWPs cannot be launched directly from their exe files; their program files are hidden away in special directories that regular users are not allowed to access. The idea behind UWP was to create an application that could be programmed once and run on all Windows devices, both phone and desktop. This way, it would be easier to create software for Windows Phone, thus incentivizing developers to write more mobile apps. However, with the demise of Windows Phone and the failure of Windows 8, it doesn't seem that UWPs need to exist anymore. Yet, despite this, Microsoft is throwing more and more resources into UWP. They've converted all of their first party-software to the UWP platform, made it the only kind of software that can run on Windows VR/AR/MR headsets, and stopped adding new features to Win32 entirely. Where is Microsoft going with this? Does Microsoft plan to eventually deprecate Win32? Microsoft hasn't made their goals or intentions very clear, and it's causing no small amount of concern in the developer community. The fact that they have no public plans to deprecate Win32 at the moment is little comfort- everything Microsoft has done so far has indicated otherwise.

04/23/2019

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https://www.microsoft.com/accessories/en-us/mice

Mice. Find your new Microsoft mouse that is as sleek and stylish as it is functional.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/desktop/inputdev/mouse-input

A window that has captured the mouse receives all mouse input, regardless of the position of the cursor, except when a mouse button is clicked while the cursor hot spot is in the window of another thread. SetCapture: Sets the mouse capture to the specified window belonging to the current thread.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/14206

In the search box, type mouse, and then click Mouse. Click the Wheel tab, and then do one of the following: To set the number of lines the screen will scroll for each notch of mouse wheel movement, under Vertical Scrolling, select The following number of lines at a time, and then enter the number of lines you want to scroll in the box.

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/surface-mouse/8qbtdr3q4rpw

The mouse is nice, when it works. I'm on my second mouse, each one lasted approximately 3-months before the scroll wheel quit working. As I was scrolling with the mouse, I felt the wheel start free-wheeling and stop scrolling. I thought the first one was a fluke, but two in a row, both at about 3-months?? Poor quality considering the price point.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4023466

Your Surface Typing Cover has a touchpad with two buttons that you can use like a mouse. Use touchpad gestures to do common tasks. Learn how to adjust touchpad settings for things like changing scroll direction or preventing the touchpad from responding to accidental touches.