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https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/nvda-nonvisual-desktop-access/9nvl6z0tm57d

NVDA (NonVisual Desktop Access) is a free “screen reader” which enables blind and vision impaired people to independently use the Windows Operating system. It reads the text on the screen in a computerised voice. You can control what is read to you by moving the cursor to the relevant area of text with a mouse or the arrows on your keyboard.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/use-a-screen-reader-to-explore-and-navigate...

To navigate a task, swipe left or right. To select an item, double-tap the screen. To exit Edit task view, swipe left until you hear "Close button," and then double-tap the screen. See also. Use a screen reader to create a plan and add buckets in Planner. Use a screen reader to sort and order tasks on a board in Planner

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/use-a-screen-reader-to-explore-and-navigate...

Use your screen reader to navigate around and between the main views in Microsoft Forms. We have tested it with Narrator and JAWS in Microsoft Edge, but it might work with other screen readers and browsers as long as they follow common accessibility standards and techniques.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/use-a-screen-reader-to-share-your-screen-in...

The screen reader focus stays on the button you just selected, so to keep changing the slides just press Return. Zoom in to shared content. Note: To use the zoom shortcuts, you need to have the Use keyboard shortcuts to zoom option selected in the Accessibility preferences.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/use-a-screen-reader-to-show-your...

Use PowerPoint with your keyboard and a screen reader to deliver your presentation to the audience using the Presenter View or Slide Show view. To make the most of your presentation, we recommend that you use the Presenter View.We have tested it with Narrator, JAWS, and NVDA, but it might work with other screen readers as long as they follow common accessibility standards and techniques.